Deli Spice: Chau Cha

Heard this from Running Man ep 111.

Deli Spice: Chau Chau

너의 목소리가 들려
너의 목소리가 들려

너의 목소리가 들려
너의 목소리가 들려

아무리 애를 쓰고 막아보려 하는데도
아무리 애를 쓰고 막아보려 하는데도

너의 목소리가 들려
너의 목소리가 들려

아무리 애를 쓰고 막아보려 하는데도
아무리 애를 쓰고 막아보려 해도

너의 목소리가 들려
너의 목소리가 들려

아무리 애를 쓰고 막아보려 하는데도
아무리 애를 쓰고 막아보려 해도

너의 목소리가 들려
너의 목소리가 들려

너의 목소리
너의 목소리

너의 목소리가 들려

너의 목소리
너의 목소리

너의 목소리가 들려

I hear your voice
I hear your voice

I hear your voice
I hear your voice

Even though I try not for the life of me to hear it
Even though I try not for the life of me to hear it

I hear your voice
I hear your voice

Even though I try not for the life of me to hear it
Even though I try not for the life of me to hear it

I hear your voice
I hear your voice

Even though I try not for the life of me to hear it
Even though I try not for the life of me to hear it

I hear your voice
I hear your voice

Your voice
Your voice

I hear your voice

Your voice
Your voice

I hear your voice

neo-ui moksoriga deullyeo
neo-ui moksoriga deullyeo

neo-ui moksoriga deullyeo
neo-ui moksoriga deullyeo

ahmoori aereulsseugo magaboryeo haneundaedo
ahmoori aereulsseugo magaboryeo haneundaedo

neo-ui moksoriga deullyeo
neo-ui moksoriga deullyeo

ahmoori aereulsseugo magaboryeo haneundaedo
ahmoori aereulsseugo magaboryeo haedo

neo-ui moksoriga deullyeo
neo-ui moksoriga deullyeo

ahmoori aereulsseugo magaboryeo haneundaedo
ahmoori aereulsseugo magaboryeo haedo

neo-ui moksoriga deullyeo
neo-ui moksoriga deullyeo

neo-ui moksori
neo-ui moksori

neo-ui moksoriga deullyeo

neo-ui moksori
neo-ui moksori

neo-ui moksoriga deullyeo

Lyrics from languagebymusic

Internet Finds

Horror’s Muse

Bill Wasik and Monica Murphy. Rabid: A Cultural History of the World’s Most Diabolical Virus. Viking, 2012.

19th century cartoon of a rabid dog in a London street | Wikimedia Commons
There’s certainly something vile about a disease that does not admit even the crudest distinctions: humans can get rabies, dogs can get rabies, bats can get rabies. The vaccination syringe is especially haunting—four feet long and plunged straight into the gut.

On May 26th, surveillance cameras installed on the Miami Herald building captured footage of a man walking along a causeway, stopping suddenly, and dragging a vagrant out of the shade. He crouched down, stripped the vagrant naked, and proceeded to chew him up.

Multiple fourth grade weekends were ruined by infected foxes wandering into the yard. My sister and I would be displaced indoors, where from the windows we’d watch them salivate and stumble around the garden like drunks. They’d twitch and jerk in reaction to nonexistent stimuli, while completely ignoring our legitimate threats—screams, hurled rocks. I remember these sick foxes with distinct disgust: there is almost nothing more hideous than an animal without instincts.

Rabid is more than just a cabinet of curiosities though. It is, in fact, a book reviewer’s worst nightmare. Plotted like a chess match, it stays multiple steps ahead of even the most free-associating of readers. It leaves almost no room for transcendent analysis.

“For centuries,” they write, “rabies was the only illness in which the animalistic transfer, or more like transformation, was clear.” Besides hypersexuality (thirty ejaculations in a single day!), one of the disease’s most gruesome symptoms is hydrophobia, “an eerie and fully physical manner,” in which the desperately thirsty patient cannot bring himself to drink. The diaphragm involuntarily contracts and the throat spasms, producing “cries of agony” that give “the impression of an almost animal bark.” After sustaining a rabid bite from a pet fox in 1819, the Duke of Richmond was so repelled by water that he “could not even accept his customary shave.” He died, “like an animal, in a barn laid with straw.”

There’s certainly something vile about a disease that does not admit even the crudest distinctions: humans can get rabies, dogs can get rabies, bats can get rabies. The vaccination syringe is especially haunting—four feet long and plunged straight into the gut. And the literalness of the disease’s course is revolting: its “time of onset depends on the distance of the wound from the head.” The very etiology of rabies is mythic: once the bite heals and the virus has traveled to the brain, “the wound will usually return, as if by magic, with some odd sensation occurring at the site.” Then there’s the fact that no definitive diagnosis can be made without taking a biopsy of the sick animal’s brain, leaving only one gory solution: decapitation.

n+1 | Horror’s Muse

You’ve got to sell your heart

Late-1938, eager to gain some feedback on her work, aspiring young author and Radcliffe sophomore Frances Turnbull sent a copy of her latest story to celebrated novelist and friend of the family, F. Scott Fitzgerald. Before long the feedback arrived, in the form of the somewhat harsh but admirably honest reply seen below.

The amateur, seeing how the professional having learned all that he’ll ever learn about writing can take a trivial thing such as the most superficial reactions of three uncharacterized girls and make it witty and charming—the amateur thinks he or she can do the same.

I’ve read the story carefully and, Frances, I’m afraid the price for doing professional work is a good deal higher than you are prepared to pay at present. You’ve got to sell your heart, your strongest reactions, not the little minor things that only touch you lightly, the little experiences that you might tell at dinner. This is especially true when you begin to write, when you have not yet developed the tricks of interesting people on paper, when you have none of the technique which it takes time to learn. When, in short, you have only your emotions to sell.

The amateur, seeing how the professional having learned all that he’ll ever learn about writing can take a trivial thing such as the most superficial reactions of three uncharacterized girls and make it witty and charming—the amateur thinks he or she can do the same. But the amateur can only realize his ability to transfer his emotions to another person by some such desperate and radical expedient as tearing your first tragic love story out of your heart and putting it on pages for people to see.

That, anyhow, is the price of admission. Whether you are prepared to pay it or, whether it coincides or conflicts with your attitude on what is “nice” is something for you to decide. But literature, even light literature, will accept nothing less from the neophyte. It is one of those professions that wants the “works.” You wouldn’t be interested in a soldier who was only a little brave.

Letter of Note | You’ve got to sell your heart

Once Upon a Time

The lure of the fairy tale.

She was astonished to see how her grandmother looked | Wikimedia Commons

In Grimms’ Fairy Tales there is a story called “The Stubborn Child” that is only one paragraph long. Here it is, in a translation by the fairy-tale scholar Jack Zipes

Once upon a time there was a stubborn child who never did what his mother told him to do. The dear Lord, therefore, did not look kindly upon him, and let him become sick. No doctor could cure him and in a short time he lay on his deathbed. After he was lowered into his grave and covered over with earth, one of his little arms suddenly emerged and reached up into the air. They pushed it back down and covered the earth with fresh earth, but that did not help. The little arm kept popping out. So the child’s mother had to go to the grave herself and smack the little arm with a switch. After she had done that, the arm withdrew, and then, for the first time, the child had peace beneath the earth.

This story, with its unvarnished prose, should be clear, but it isn’t. Was the child buried alive? The unconsenting arm looks more like a symbol. And what about the mother? Didn’t it trouble her to whip that arm? Then we are told that the youngster, after this beating, rested in peace. Really? When, before, he had seemed to beg for life? But the worst thing in the story is that, beyond disobedience, it gives us not a single piece of information about the child. No name, no age, no pretty or ugly. We don’t even know if it is a boy or a girl. (The Grimms used ein Kind, the neuter word for “child.” Zipes decided that the child was a boy.) And so the tale, without details to attach it to anything in particular, becomes universal. Whatever happened there, we all deserve it. A. S. Byatt has written that this is the real terror of the story: “It doesn’t feel like a warning to naughty infants. It feels like a glimpse of the dreadful side of the nature of things.” That is true of very many of the Grimms’ tales, even those with happy endings.

The New Yorker | Once Upon a Time: The lure of the fairy tale.

of mice clicking in unison

There have been a few online bullying these days that can easily leaves one in despair just thinking about modern day morality. What is wrong with people? where did all the self-entitlement and hard-ass confidence come from?

First it’s our home-grown blogger queen, Xiaxue, being called a Geylang Chicken in various uninspiring ways. I’m not saying I like her but I definitely don’t hate her. Although Xiaxue’s method of dealing with those bugger is a tad vicious, I gotta admit I admire her ass-kickery skill, and really, those men had it coming. If you don’t like something, you just close your browser tab. You don’t even have to close your Internet Explorer. And they are rather silly to post malicious comments using their real FaceBook account, with their family photo as their profile pics. And what I don’t understand most are the wives of these men who failed to understand what their men had did wrong. Women, what’s going on?! Love is blind, yes, but don’t tah stamp your eyes (be so ignorant) to the point that you can’t see that major character flaw in your partner. But that’s another rant for another day.

Then there’s the etsy’s featured seller Ecologica Malibu, who passes factory work for handmade pieces. What irked people was the way etsy twisted and turned their word to defend the seller and the way the seller reacted upon exposure. They had a dimwit lawyer who can’t write good to act on their behalf. Good thing there’s still sane lawyers to save the day.

Then yesterday night, I typed the key ‘t’ and loaded the oatmeal, checking to see if there’s any fresh comic out. And I saw this headline

“FunnyJunk is threatening to file a federal lawsuit against me unless I pay $20,000 in damages”

Wait what? What’s happening? I thought that incident was long gone? Turned out that FunnyJunk was not very happy being called out, like how a bully is not happy when being pointed out as a bully, and decided that they want $20,000 to sooth their wounded pride.

This is when Matthew Inman turned from a online comic artist to semi-god. He turned THIS IS SPARTAAAAA on FunnyJunk.
He wrote an awesome retort and a perfect solution. He will raise and give the $20,000. Not to give to a douchebag lawyer and a eyesore of a website, but to bears and cancer-fighting.

He started “Operation BearLove Good Cancer Bad“. Gave it 15 days to raise the $20,000. Within an hour, that $20 grand is done deal and about 24 hours later, he’d raised over $117,000 with donations coming from over 8,000 people. At this moment, $148,917 been raised, and donations are still flowing in.

My heart can’t help but swell with pride. How this community of lurkers and anonymous give what we can to do what is right.

All these are none of our business. But the suppressed little feeling of indignation that we have accumulated from everyday life, – from fellow commuters who don’t understand why it’s rude to play their music out loud on public transport, from queue-cutters who thought nothing of jumping into a snaking queue, from co-workers who promptly leave for the day after giving you a next-morning deadline during a 6pm briefing – popped out like a 2-size-too-small shirt button when we see one of our beloved online staple being bullied like the rest of us.

I could almost hear the thousands of mice clicking in unison. Ommmmm….atmeaaaal

Carbon Monoxide Haunting


image source: Wikimedia | Beware of carbon monoxide

Carbon monoxide poisoning has also been implicated as the cause of apparent haunted houses. Symptoms such as delirium and hallucinations have led people suffering poisoning to think they have seen ghosts or to believe their house is haunted.

Wikipedia | ^ Albert Donnay (October 31, 2004). “A True Tale Of A Truly Haunted House”. Ghostvillage.com. Retrieved 2008-12-16.

The American Journal of Emergency Medicine that reported an investigated case of a young woman found in her home with carbon monoxide poisoning who was dealing with paranoid feelings as well as hyperventilation.

Nevertheless, could it be that many of the haunted houses in America to this day are the result of people breathing carbon monoxide from a heating source and then experiencing strange sensations from the complex world of the brain? To prove more of what’s possible, a medical report was written up just three years ago in The American Journal of Emergency Medicine that reported an investigated case of a young woman found in her home with carbon monoxide poisoning who was dealing with paranoid feelings as well as hyperventilation.

The hyperventilation might seem a routine symptom, but the standout was when the woman claimed to see a ghost in her bathroom when authorities arrived.

Yahoo | See ghosts? There may be a medical reason

Instead, Nickell says “ghosts” are often the result of pranks, environmental phenomenon, or physiological conditions such as sleep paralysis and the hypnogogic and hypnopompic hallucinations that accompany it.

Dr. Priyanka Yadav, a sleep specialist at the Somerset Medical Sleep for Life Center in Hillsborough, N.J., says sleep paralysis occurs when there’s a disconnect between mind and body while people are going in or coming out of REM sleep.
“It seems like you’re paralyzed, which naturally occurs when you’re sleeping,” says Yadav.

“But this somehow happens while you’re awake. It can last from a few seconds to a minute or two and is often associated with hypnagogic hallucinations, things you might see when trying to fall asleep or hypnopompic hallucinations, things you see when you’re trying to wake up.”

Yadav says these “waking dreams” can involve serpents, spiders, intruders, and yes, even ghosts and are often associated with feelings of dread.

“They’ll often see someone coming into their room and they’re not able to move or talk or scream or do anything.”

“Some people have visions where they feel something is trying to strangle or choke them or they have a sense of impending doom,” she says. “They’ll often see someone coming into their room and they’re not able to move or talk or scream or do anything.”

In a May 2009 paper in the journal Cortex, psychologists from Goldsmiths College in London wrote about their attempt to do just that. They then asked 79 participants to spend 50 minutes inside their “haunted” chamber.

msnbc | See ghosts? There may be a medical reason

A review of such work is presented, followed by the results of the “Haunt” project in which an attempt was made to construct an artificial “haunted” room by systematically varying such environmental factors.

Recent research has suggested that a number of environmental factors may be associated with a tendency for susceptible individuals to report mildly anomalous sensations typically associated with “haunted” locations, including a sense of presence, feeling dizzy, inexplicable smells, and so on. Factors that may be associated with such sensations include fluctuations in the electromagnetic field (EMF) and the presence of infrasound. A review of such work is presented, followed by the results of the “Haunt” project in which an attempt was made to construct an artificial “haunted” room by systematically varying such environmental factors. Participants (N=79) were required to spend 50 min in a specially constructed chamber, within which they were exposed to infrasound, complex EMFs, both or neither. They were informed in advance that during this period they might experience anomalous sensations and asked to record on a floor plan their location at the time of occurrence of any such sensations, along with a note of the time of occurrence and a brief description of the sensation. Upon completing the session in the experimental chamber, they were asked to complete three questionnaires.

National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) | The “Haunt” project: an attempt to build a “haunted” room by manipulating complex electromagnetic fields and infrasound.

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